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    Family Pictures: USA

FAMILY PICTURES: USA

Detroit is The Future…And It’s Okay!

What’s Your Detroit Story?

As part of a new television series being filmed for PBS’ WORLD Channel, Family Pictures: USA will be in Detroit for a series of filmed interviews with average Detroiters to get their take on the Motor City, its past, present and future, as seen through the family photo album. Our theme is “Detroit is the Future…And it’s Okay!” and we want to illuminate that special Detroit that has always been there…through the bad times, certainly, but also during the good times…those times spent with family, friends, neighbors, the people we love and who love us. That Detroit is the real Detroit. It doesn’t always get mentioned in newspapers or magazines; seen on movie screens or television sets. But that, to us, it the only Detroit that really matters.

Bring a selection of your favorite photographs – digital or actual photo – to our Community Photo- Sharing Sessions (see the schedule) and spend 10-15 minutes with our Family Pictures: USA Production Team telling us about YOUR Detroit story.

Sessions are First Come, First Served…and interview spots are limited to the first 30 participants (individuals and singles welcome; as are couples, friends and family groups – families by birth and by choice are all welcome!) who sign-up.

To reserve your spot, please send an email to: 1World1Family.me@gmail.com and mention: “My Detroit Story” in the subject line. You can also call us at: (212) 281 – 6002 and ask for: “Detroit Desk.”

And be sure to check out the Family Pictures: USA Trailer


Family Pictures: USA Trailer

Family Pictures: USA is a documentary-style magazine show, filmed before a live studio audience, that journeys through a rapidly changing landscape where the foundations of a familiar and idealized “AMERICA” are being transformed.

The Mighty Joe Von Battle – Requiem for a Record Shop Man

My father, the late Joe Von Battle, was an important mid-century recorder and producer of blues and gospel music in Detroit, from 1945 until 1967. He has been called the “Chess of Detroit”, referring to the iconic Chicago Record company, and is regarded by many as a cornerstone in the building of the “Detroit Sound.”

Before You Came, We Were Here: An Ojibway Family & The Making of Detroit

Chantel Henry (Ginew Kwe or "Golden Eagle Woman") became aware of her and her family's deep connection to the city of Detroit about four years ago. We are so honored that she decided to share with us the story of how her grandparents, Arnold and Freda Henry, came to Detroit and her family's rich history in the city.


Photos From The DDFR Community

These are recent photos submitted by online participants.

Alexis Arnold shared Digital Diaspora Family Reunion Roadshow's photo to the group: Digital Diaspora Family Reunion.

I'm amazed by the history of such an accomplished family, and I'm glad to see that their legacy is carried on by their daughter today!
--> bit.ly/Barthwell-Detroit
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"Distinguished Detroiters: The Barthwell Family History" --> bit.ly/Barthwell-Detroit2 “In spite of these humble beginnings, Daddy accomplished a great deal. Although he had no school record...

Im amazed by the history of such an accomplished family, and Im glad to see that their legacy is carried on by their daughter today!
--> http://bit.ly/Barthwell-Detroit

Natalie Shmuel shared Digital Diaspora Family Reunion Roadshow's photo to the group: Digital Diaspora Family Reunion.

Amazing piece, beautiful story of a family's experience in one home... with pictures from the very beginning til today.
"65 Years, 4 Generations, 1 Home"
bit.ly/boston-edison
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"A Boston-Edison Tale: 65 Years, 4 Generations, 1 Home" --> bit.ly/boston-edison "One day in the spring of 1952, [my great-aunt] Viola was walking down West Boston Blvd after finishing up a da...

Amazing piece, beautiful story of a familys experience in one home... with pictures from the very beginning til today.
65 Years, 4 Generations, 1 Home 
http://bit.ly/boston-edison

This is the only photo (so far) of me and my siblings, taken in our paternal grandmother’s high-rise apartment on Chicago’s south side, on Grandmother’s 71st birthday, October 12, 1971. At 19, I’m the oldest by far of my siblings, with the big ‘fro and “subdued” look; my sister Marion, 12, sits to the right. Grandmother gazes on gamely, as Dad holds unhappy Kati, eleven months; Maggi, five, and Kristi, three, complete the portrait. . . almost. If you look closely, you’ll see an arm behind Grandmother’s back.

Grandmother has just met her three younger grandchildren; since my parents’ divorce in 1965 and my father’s subsequent remarriage, she and her only son have been estranged. Her “faux solidarity” with my mother, Marion, and I, particularly in light of my father having married a white woman, only adds to the stress of being left “the man of the house” for my mother, sister, and maternal grandmother, who lives with us. A surprise “reunion” is my Creative Breakthrough, arranging with them to drive over from Cleveland, for her birthday on Columbus Day, a national holiday.

I hadn’t bargained on Mother finding out, much less insisting on coming to the party! By the time this photo was taken, “you could’ve bought me for a nickel and gotten four cents change”. Not only was Mother there; she was engaged – she organized and TOOK this photo! It has only occurred to me in recent years that Mother was a skilled photographer, who had operated the Photography Lab at Talladega College, including developing her own prints. If she’d had access to Photoshop, my STEPMOTHER’S ARM would likely have disappeared as well.
... See MoreSee Less

This is the only photo (so far) of me and my siblings, taken in our paternal grandmother’s high-rise apartment on Chicago’s south side, on Grandmother’s 71st birthday, October 12, 1971.  At 19, I’m the oldest by far of my siblings, with the big ‘fro and “subdued” look; my sister Marion, 12, sits to the right.  Grandmother gazes on gamely, as Dad holds unhappy Kati, eleven months; Maggi, five, and Kristi, three, complete the portrait. . . almost.  If you look closely, you’ll see an arm behind Grandmother’s back.

Grandmother has just met her three younger grandchildren; since my parents’ divorce in 1965 and my father’s subsequent remarriage, she and her only son have been estranged.  Her “faux solidarity” with my mother, Marion, and I, particularly in light of my father having married a white woman, only adds to the stress of being left “the man of the house” for my mother, sister, and maternal grandmother, who lives with us.   A surprise “reunion” is my Creative Breakthrough, arranging with them to drive over from Cleveland, for her birthday on Columbus Day, a national holiday.

I hadn’t bargained on Mother finding out, much less insisting on coming to the party!  By the time this photo was taken, “you could’ve bought me for a nickel and gotten four cents change”.  Not only was Mother there; she was engaged – she organized and TOOK this photo!  It has only occurred to me in recent years that Mother was a skilled photographer, who had operated the Photography Lab at Talladega College, including developing her own prints.  If she’d had access to Photoshop, my STEPMOTHER’S ARM would likely have disappeared as well.

Muteeat Lawal, Alva Chinn and 6 others like this

Natalie ShmuelThis is absolutely perfect!

7 days ago   ·  1

4 Replies

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Charese Jordan MooreFunny! I loved your mother! We moved from Chicago in 1971 in time for school to start. So that was b4 this picture, but that's how I remember BFF Marion. I remember her talking about Maggie. I also enjoyed visiting your grandmother in Lake Meadows. Memories! That disembodied arm, though! lol

7 days ago   ·  1
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When I went home to Forrest City Ark to see family, I went to my sister's church, Lane Chapel C.M.E. It is is an old-school Black Protestant church where the a piano and drums accompany the choir and the Preacher, a fellow classmate at Lincoln Junior High School, calls members to read the scriptures and yes there was at least one woman who was seriously into church lady hatdom. At the end of service the good Reverend asked anyone who needed a blessing for strength to come forward and slowly half of the Congregation walked to the front of the church. ... See MoreSee Less

When I went home to Forrest City Ark to see family, I went to my sisters church, Lane Chapel C.M.E.  It is is an old-school Black Protestant church where the a piano and drums accompany the choir and the Preacher, a fellow classmate at Lincoln Junior High School, calls members to read the scriptures and yes there was at least one woman who was seriously into church lady hatdom.  At the end of service the good Reverend asked anyone who needed a blessing for strength to come forward and slowly half of the Congregation walked to the front of the church.

Connie Bottinelli, Millie Wilson and 5 others like this

Connie BottinelliWonderful telling of that moment.

6 days ago
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Wonderful PARTICIPANTS at our "Transforming the Family Album" workshop at the Allied Media Conference in Detroit this morning - including filmmakers, artists, writers, media organizations, activists, students... multi-gender & inter-generational.

Pls welcome them to Digital Diaspora Family Reunion and follow/ support their various projects, journeys, films, art projects and memoirs!!!

Here is the description of the workshop: "How can narratives within the family album change the way we see others and ourselves? This session will explore various ways artists and activists can reshape the family album to empower communities for a 21st Century. Participants will investigate and share stories rooted within their own family photographic collections and archives. Participants will create and develop community photo sharing and digitizing projects tailored to their own work and organizations."
... See MoreSee Less

Wonderful PARTICIPANTS at our Transforming the Family Album workshop at the Allied Media Conference in Detroit this morning  - including filmmakers, artists, writers, media organizations, activists, students... multi-gender & inter-generational.

Pls welcome them to Digital Diaspora Family Reunion and follow/ support their various projects, journeys, films, art projects and memoirs!!!

Here is the description of the workshop:  How can narratives within the family album change the way we see others and ourselves? This session will explore various ways artists and activists can reshape the family album to empower communities for a 21st Century. Participants will investigate and share stories rooted within their own family photographic collections and archives. Participants will create and develop community photo sharing and digitizing projects tailored to their own work and organizations.

Alva Chinn, Denyse Jones and 13 others like this

Albert Dixon Cunningham IIIi WANTED to be there! :O

1 week ago
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