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    Educational Resources

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Educational Resources

Here are educational lesson plans created by the 1World1Family team:

Capturing African American History: Visual Storytelling with Family Photographs
Students will create multimedia/media projects with camera phones, digital cameras, traditional cameras or existing video/film equipment available at school.
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African American Identity in the Gilded Age: Two Unreconciled Strivings
Examine the tension experienced by African-Americans as they struggled to establish a vibrant and meaningful identity based on the promises of liberty and equality in the midst of a society that was ambivalent towards them and sought to impose an inferior definition upon them.
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Preserving a Tintype as a Photograph: How to convert a Tintype to a Photograph
Tintypes, or ferrotypes, were a popular form of photography from 1855 to about 1900. If you have a tintype, you should make a copy to display so the original can be kept safely stored. This is an easy way to preserve your family’s memories for years to come. In her eHow article, Ms. Fowler elaborates on two easy methods of converting your tintype to a photograph: either scanning the tintype or photographing it.
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DC Public Library (DCPL) Memory Lab: Preservation of personal archives and histories
People can digitize their old home movies, floppies, and photographs at the personal archiving lab, DC Public Library Memory Lab. Their goal is preservation of personal archives and histories for self-knowledge, the education of future generations, and creative reuse.
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Turning Strangers into Family: Create your own family archive
An interdisciplinary course that Thomas Allen Harris is teaching in the Yale School of Art entitled “Strategies of Visual Memoir in Art Practice”, a studio-based class that explores the use of archives in constructing real and fictive narratives across a variety of disciplines. This class coincides with an  exhibition designed to encourage people to engage with their own family photographic archives – a central focus and the mission of DDFR.
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